Learn to Play Blues Harp Harmonica
Black Cat Bone

Black Cat Bone are very good at slipping in to a laid-back groove and driving it for all it’s worth. Swanky harmonica solos, funky chicken guitar and soulful blues wails. – Jessy Terry

Harping The Blues!

William Clarke

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3 Comments for 'Black Cat Bone'

  1.  
    kelsey
    September 19, 2009 | 11:39 pm
     

    What does it mean when a bone is black?
    I found a black bone-looking thing on the ground by a creek. Its really smooth, and looks kinda old. Somebody told me that it means that the bone is from the ice age. Does anybody know anything about this type of thing?

  2.  
    STEVE C
    September 20, 2009 | 4:41 am
     

    It does sound like a fossilized bone, but there’s no telling how old it is without having an expert look at it. If there’s a university or natural history museum nearby let them take a look at it.
    References :

  3.  
    Bolide Chaser
    September 20, 2009 | 4:43 am
     

    The answer to your question, "Does anybody know anything about what it means when a bone turns black?" is yes, and they are called, "paleontologists". Many of them work at museums, so Steve C.’s answer is accurate.
    But I would like to add that many bones have been found in stream beds and along shorelines from South Carolina to Florida. Most of those that are "black", or dark brown, have had their calcium "replaced" by minerals called "phosphates". This replacement process takes a long time. Paleontologists have determined that many of these dark-colored bones are from animals that lived during the "ice age". That is why many people assume that when a bone is black it is from the "ice age".
    But in the western U.S. paleontologists have found bones that are many times older than the "ice age". When these bones are found in light-colored rock, the bones are typically light-colored, too. That’s because the bone has been "replaced" by the light-colored minerals in that rock.
    So, the color of a fossil bone has more to do with the kind of minerals where it was found, than how old it is.
    References :
    http://www.discoverfossils.com/Fossils/Fossilization.html

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